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BADA Response to “Freedom Budget”

 


BADA Response to “Freedom Budget”
 
Perhaps by now many of you have read or aware of the “Freedom Budget” as proposed by the AAM and a coalition of students at Dartmouth College.  Fundamentally it outlines the many unmet needs of diverse students which have been repeatedly raised for the past 40 years.  Uniquely, this time the coalition has shown great courage to present a set of demands with a timetable for response.
 
We are encouraged and supportive of the position, as we know many of us have participated on committees and task force for many years only to see the work shelved and no follow-up action.   One might conclude that this approach to diplomacy, has not valued  amongst the priorities within the College’s administration or trustee agendas.  This new approach is not abstract, but list a number of cogent opportunities which are present concerns and significantly effect the enrollment, engagement and  success of prospective students at Dartmouth.  Now is the time for these changes to be included in the strategic outlook for the College.
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How could the author of the Declaration of Independence have owned slaves?

 

Join Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed ’81 on November 16 for a fascinating Dartmouth on Location lecture, "Slavery at Monticello: The American Paradox," at the American Institute of Architects in Washington, D.C., and learn more about this American contradiction. Professor Gordon-Reed will also provide a preview of her latest research.

gordonreedphotoMonticello was the home of Thomas Jefferson, the man who wrote the Declaration of Independence, penned the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, founded the University of Virginia, and yet held more than 700 people in bondage during his lifetime. The American paradox is most present at Monticello, and it is therefore the perfect place to consider the struggles the country has had over slavery, freedom and race.

Professor Gordon-Reed published her first book, Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy, in 1997. In 2008, Professor Gordon-Reed published The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family, which won 16 book awards, including the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History and the National Book Award. The Hemingses of Monticello traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family’s dispersal after Jefferson’s death in 1826.

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Ad Hoc Committee - Faculty Diversity

 

The committee has recently published it's findings and recommendations for improvements in Dartmouth faculty diversity.  The full report and important appendices are available  at the bottom of the following link.  Fac-Diversity

This is  an important issue for all of us, and I would encourage you to send questions and comments to the alumni council representatives contained within the link.  This will be one way to express your interest and affirm the importance of this issue to the College.

We will keep you informed of the developments as strategies become available.